Cecilia Valdés, it's never too late…

Cecilia Valdés, Teatro de la Zarzuela

 

Cecilia Valdés, Teatro de la Zarzuela

Cecilia Valdés, Teatro de la Zarzuela

Cecilia Valdés, Teatro de la Zarzuela

Cecilia Valdés, Teatro de la Zarzuela

Cecilia Valdés, Teatro de la Zarzuela

Cecilia Valdés, it's never too late…
Cecilia Valdés
Gonzalo Roig (1890-1970)
Libretto by Agustín Rodríguez and José Sanches-Clay,
based on the novel Cecilia Valdés or Loma of the Angel
D. musical: Oliver Diaz
D. scene: Carlos Wagner
Scenography: Rifail Ajdarpasic
Locker room: Christophe Ouvrard
Lighting: Fabrice Kebour
Choreography: Nuria Castejón
Distribution: Elizabeth Knight, Martin Nusspaumer,
Homer Perez-Miranda, Linda Mirabal, Cristina Faus, Yusniel Estrada
In this fortunate line of the Teatro de la Zarzuela to recover our operatic heritage, It has been released these days the Cuban zarzuela, "Cecilia Valdés". the composer, Gonzalo Roig (Havana, 1890 – 1970) Cuban zarzuela redefined and made it a lyrical reference América.La traveler zarzuela was born with spirit and Cecilia Valdes is one of the clearest examples. Spaniards in the late nineteenth century and first half of the twentieth came to America, they did it, as, bringing their culture and music. were also determining orchestras and zarzuela companies who moved to act there to give coverage to the many musical emigrantes.Cecilia Valdés has the peculiarities of Caribbean and African sones, as good zarzuela, costumbristas the most recognizable and popular episodes at the time of its composition. The score is an extraordinary rhythmic richness. Bembé, guaracha, contradanza or Bolero, africanizantes combined with sounds and afrocubanos, Linda numbers as Mariscal, fully Cuban. But also they appear in the score and lyrical moments full of romance, as duets between Cecilia and Leonardo. The result is the perfect combination of popular music and lyricism, in a mixture of genres that complement each other and make "Cecilia Valdés" the most important work of Cuban music.

The scenery of Carlos Wagner, good knowledge of Caribbean culture, where big challenge was to acclimate the work, and he has done so in pre-revolutionary Cuba.

The main scenario remains fixed while flowing within it the elements that put each of the scenes. Get transform, factly, a sugar plantation in a ballroom where the protagonists celebrate their festivals. The speed and fluidity of change does not stop at all the pace of work. The colors, lighting and textures, you move to Cuba and the Caribbean atmosphere of high temperatures.
The libretto by Agustín Rodríguez and José Sánchez Arcilla, based on the novel Cecilia Valdés or Loma of the Angel, Cirilo Villaverde, It presents the problems of coexistence between slaves and mestizos, criticism of slavery and the consequences of sexism and racism. It also shows that mixture of religion and paganism which appears in an end of the play something strange that surprised the public.

The theatrical part of the work is very important and is brilliantly covered by Paloma Córdoba, Alberto Vazquez, Eduardo Carranza, Ileana Wilson, Moisés Giraldo Cardenas, Isabel and Juan Matute House. Cuban dance body as a whole was a protagonist of this zarzuela and the most applauded of the night.
Cubans are also some of the protagonists, soprano Elizabeth Caballero as, He defended its leading role of Cecilia Valdés so more solvent. It was not very well accompanied vocally by Martin Nusspaumer that, but nevertheless, If you built a good Leonardo in the interpretive part.

Baritone Homero Perez-Miranda, as José Dolores, Cristina Faus and mezzosoprano, in the role of Isabel Ilincheta, They were high in their respective interpretations. You can say the same for the rest of the cast. It should be noted the extraordinary participation of Linda Mariscal, who he played the freed slave Dolores Santa Cruz.

historical representation, although late, the first and most important Cuban zarzuela rising to the stage of the Teatro de la Zarzuela. Hopefully come after Cecilia Valdés some more.

Text: Paloma Sanz
pictures: Javier del Real

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